Queer Representation Dominates Oscars

From queer winners, stories and Shangela stepping out in drag on the red carpet, this year's Oscars showcased many LGBT+ features.

Queer Representation Dominates Oscars

Last night’s Oscars is being coined as “the queerest yet”. For the first time, over half of the Best Picture nominations included LGBT+ characters or actors.

This year’s nominees “reflect a banner year for LGBTQ inclusion in the film” US LGBT+ organization GLAAD said.

“The diversity across the full list of nominations should be celebrated and will no doubt lead to more inclusive, culture-changing films,” said GLAAD Presiden Sarah Kate Ellis.

Shangela Laquifa Wadley may have made history as the first Oscars attendee to walk the Oscars red carpet in drag.

Shangela appeared in A Star is Born, which also stars Lady Gaga and fellow Drag Race queen Willam. The film scooped the award for Best Original Song for the song co-written by Gaga, ‘Shallow’.

Lady Gaga now adds an Oscar to an extremely impressive list of awards and accolades which includes 9 Grammys, 13 VMAs and 2 Golden Globes.

Another stand out moment on the red carpet was Pose star Billy Porter’s defiance of fashion norms. Poter stepped out on the red carpet in a fabulous custom gown created by Christina Siriano.

The fashion choice for the actor was a deeply personal one. Speaking to Vogue, Porter reflects on how fashion has become a powerful tool for self-expression and representation.

“When you’re black and you’re gay, one’s masculinity is in question. I dealt with a lot of homophobia in relation to my clothing choices. [Even] when I had my first working contract at A&M Records, I was silent for a long time. I was trying to fit into what other people felt I should look like. When I landed a role in Kinky Boots, the experience really grounded me in a way that was so unexpected. Putting on those heels made me feel the most masculine I’ve ever felt in my life. It was empowering to let that part of myself free.”

Gaga also got a special shout out from Olivia Colman during her wonderful acceptance speech for Best Actress for her role as Queen Anne in The Favourite.

She hailed her co-stars, Stone and Weisz, as “the two loveliest women in the world to go to work with” and also praised her fellow nominee, Glenn Close.

Other films with LGBT+ characters at their core were also big winners.

Green Book which tells the story of black jazz pianist Don Shirley and his white driver in 1960s America won for Best Picture and Best Supporting Actor.

Bohemian Rhapsody was the biggest winner on the night, taking home four awards including Best Actor for Rami Malek’s performance as Freddie Mercury.

Malek spoke about how important telling LGBT+ stories are:

“That kid was struggling with his identity … I think to anyone struggling… we made a film about a gay man, an immigrant, who lived his life just unapologetically himself. The fact that I’m celebrating him and this story with you tonight is proof that we’re longing for stories like this.”

Last but not least, we adored Melissa McCarthy’s magnificent nod to the costume from The Favourite and Mary Queen Of Scots.

The Power of Costume…

Mellssa McCarthy and Brian Tyree Henry on the power of Costume Designers.

تم النشر بواسطة ‏‎The Academy‎‏ في الأحد، ٢٤ فبراير ٢٠١٩

© 2019 GCN (Gay Community News). All rights reserved.

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